Explore: Industrial & Construction Careers

Explore: Industrial & Construction Careers

Male worker plugs in a cable

Cable Installer

Cable installers work in homes, businesses, and on construction sites to install and repair telecommunications cables. This includes phone lines, internet cables, security systems, or cable television.

Hispanic woman driving a school bus

Commercial Driver

Commercial drivers operate large vehicles such as buses, Access-A-Ride vehicles, and trucks. Truck drivers move cargo from one location to another, while bus drivers transport people.


Female fitting a sensor in a domestic interior hallway

Cable Installer

Cable installers work in homes, businesses, and on construction sites to install and repair telecommunications cables. This includes phone lines, internet cables, security systems, or cable television.

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You Are

  • Looking to work with your hands
  • Detail oriented
  • Able to lift 70 pounds
  • Able to distinguish different cable colors
  • Comfortable with heights and small spaces
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What You’ll Do

  • Run cable behind walls and ceilings to support the critical technology and data infrastructure for offices, trading floors, and other sites
  • Stand on ladders, pull cable through walls, and test and troubleshoot connectivity
  • Spend most of your day out in the field, on construction sites, or in office buildings
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Salary

Cable Installation Technicians in New York City earn an average of $38,853 ($19/hour). [Source: Glassdoor]

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Growth Projections

Prior to COVID-19, employment for this career was projected to decline 6 percent from 2018 to 2028 [Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics], but New York was also listed as one of the top 5 states with the highest employment level in this occupation. [Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics]

While it is not yet clear how COVID-19 may have impacted these projections, it is anticipated that there will still be a steady demand for cable installers to support construction and related industries.

Male technician adjusting a security camera while installing the system to the exterior of a building

African-American male truck driver looking at the camera as he sits in the driver's seat wearing his seat belt

Commercial Driver

Commercial drivers operate large vehicles such as buses, Access-A-Ride vehicles, and trucks. Truck drivers move cargo from one location to another, while bus drivers transport people.

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You Are

  • Someone who enjoys driving
  • A valid New York State driver’s license (Class D) holder for at least two years
  • Someone with a clean driving record with NO driving under the influence (DUI) or driving while intoxicated (DWI) violations
  • Someone whose driving record displays no more than one of the following:
    • Four points or fewer
    • One suspension (must be cleared for at least two years)
    • Two convictions or fewer
  • Comfortable working a flexible schedule that could include driving throughout and outside of New York City
  • Willing to undergo drug testing
  • Willing to take a medical exam to meet the NYS Department of Motor Vehicle’s (DMV) medical certification requirements
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What You’ll Do

  • Safely drive and maneuver large commercial vehicles, such as school buses, coach buses, and trucks, to transport people or products from one location to another
  • Use maps to plan routes and navigate traffic
  • Perform routine checks and maintenance for vehicle
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Salary

Commercial driving jobs, including for school bus, coach bus, Access-a-Ride, and truck driving positions, have starting salaries ranging from $17 to $22 per hour. [Source: Red Hook on the Road program data]

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Growth Projections

Prior to COVID-19, employment of bus drivers [Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics] and heavy truck drivers [Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics] was projected to grow 5% from 2018 to 2028.

It is not clear how COVID-19 will impact these projections, but we expect the demand for truck drivers to continue to meet the ongoing need for consumer goods and to keep supply chains moving. It is expected that there will be less need for school bus drivers as in-person school attendance will be limited.

Mature African-American woman driving a school bus wearing a reflective vest, looking through the open door

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